Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren

Dishin' Dirt on "Your Repair Addendum Sucks" with Mary Lane Sloan

January 21, 2021 Gary Pickren Season 2 Episode 13
Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren
Dishin' Dirt on "Your Repair Addendum Sucks" with Mary Lane Sloan
Chapters
Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren
Dishin' Dirt on "Your Repair Addendum Sucks" with Mary Lane Sloan
Jan 21, 2021 Season 2 Episode 13
Gary Pickren

I said it.  Your Repair Addendum Sucks!  It really does. From incomplete to nonsensical to the outright inaccurate. As an industry, most agents admit to receiving or even writing less than stellar repair addendum. This week's podcast looks at some of the worst examples of repair addenda, discusses the root cause of poorly written request as well as how to professionally prepare a repair addendum. Spoiler alert, it starts way before pen is put to paper. Mary Lane Sloan of the Art of Real Estate joins us to discuss this and more.

Also in this episode Eddie Yandle of Executive Construction is here to discuss nail pops and we finish with Gary's Good News Only!

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Show Notes Transcript

I said it.  Your Repair Addendum Sucks!  It really does. From incomplete to nonsensical to the outright inaccurate. As an industry, most agents admit to receiving or even writing less than stellar repair addendum. This week's podcast looks at some of the worst examples of repair addenda, discusses the root cause of poorly written request as well as how to professionally prepare a repair addendum. Spoiler alert, it starts way before pen is put to paper. Mary Lane Sloan of the Art of Real Estate joins us to discuss this and more.

Also in this episode Eddie Yandle of Executive Construction is here to discuss nail pops and we finish with Gary's Good News Only!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE PAGE:

https://www.youtube.com/c/BlairCatoPickrenCasterline

Find all of my Legal Tips, Gary's Good News Only and other fun stuff.

Unknown:

This is deshon dirt with Gary picker in South Carolina's only podcast dedicated to the real estate agents craft. Alright guys welcome back to another episode of dition dirt with Gary pickin The name of this episode is your repair addendum suck. And I really liked the name of this episode because I have seen a lot of real sucky repair addendums out over the last couple years and these repair denims are causing lots of problems for your clients for you, the attorney, the lender, and so we need to try to suck a lot less kind of reminds me of that Chicago Cubs manager a couple years ago, Joe Maddon that had a really cool t shirt had a picture of his glasses and it said Try not to suck. And so I think we need to do a better job of trying not to suck when it comes to repair denim because quite frankly, most of them simply suck. So this week, I have Mary lane Sloane with me as my special guest she is owner operator of the art of real estate in Greenville and Columbia. And not only is she one of the top agents in the Midlands, but she's a former school teacher so I figured what better person to have help us try to write better attendance than a former school teacher. So she will join us here in just a minute. I also have my good friend Eddie yandell. Eddie is the owner operator of executive construction homes here in the Midlands. We're going to talk about nail polish. And of course no episode complete without Gary's good news only now before we roll right into our episode, I would ask that y'all do me a huge favor. I spent most of the weekend working on our YouTube page I have remodeled it re redesigned it and everything. And what you're going to like about our YouTube page here at Blair Cato is it as most of you know we send out weekly legal tips, as well as a weekly Gary's good news only video. They're all about two to three minutes. And it's about a legal matter or a contract matter or even sometimes a marketing matter that's very important to you as a real estate agent in South Carolina. So what I have done is I've taken all of those legal tips and we've done about several 100 videos in the last couple years. And we have put those in nice order to find on YouTube. We have many different channels within that YouTube channel. And so it is there for you as a resource to find old legal tips about topics that are important to your craft. We also will post all of our new episodes including information about this podcast, new legal tips and so forth on there. So if you happen to miss one of my emails as to the video, you can find all of that information there. We're trying to grow the number of subscribers we have. So when you go to YouTube, and I'll put a link below in the write up of this program today, if you will go to YouTube and hit subscribe to get notifications when new videos have been uploaded. So if you would also please subscribe to this podcast. Then you'll get notification every time a new podcast comes out. I promise you that there will always be relevant topics and we'll always keep them under 30 minutes. Now on to our show today. And as I mentioned earlier, I have Mary lane Sloane the owner and operator of the art of real estate today Mary lanes joining us to talk about repair addendums Welcome Mary lane. Alright Gary, thanks so much for having me. Let's dive on. And I will first of all as you know the name of this episode is your repair addendum suck. I have seen a real sucky ones in my career. So tell me what are some of the sucky ones you've seen recently? Oh, boy, let's see where to start. I think the worst one is when you get a repair addendum that says see attached report. And they've just taken a highlighter or a red pin and like circled are highlighted items on the inspection report. And the problem with that is, you know, most of the time in the inspector is like, you know, for example, the lifted shingle have contractor evaluate. So when they just send over that highlighted, I don't really know what they're asking do they want it repaired? Do they want to replace? Do they want a new roof? Do they just want me to have somebody look at it. If I have somebody look at it, and they call for repair? Do I have that repair made? Or do I just say well, I had somebody look at it. I agree. Yeah. Yeah, there's an attached agenda. Yeah, that's it. That's a spec report. Thank you. We agree. Thank you. Yeah. The I guess a step up from that would be when you get an agenda item and it just has items 127 2437 46 and you're like okay from what you know and again that goes back to the same problem even if I you know if I have two brain cells to rub together and I can match like okay item one on the inspection report says you know possible leaking toilet have evaluated again, we're back in the same boat like am I repairing that or am I just having it evaluated? Like it's super ambiguous, right, I had a closing actually fall through because of that they wrote 1578 or something like that. The people signed it and then they came to closing and they haven't made any repairs. It goes yeah, I just signed saying that those items were on there. You didn't ask me to repair anyway. Right? Well, you know, also when you get an agenda that just says make all repairs. What Okay, like because again, you go back to the report and a lot of the inspection inspectors Home Inspectors do 100 h back. A lot of times they're not calling for a specific repair, they're calling for further evaluation. So when you send over an addendum that just says make all repairs, like, all right, according to who, what, what repairs, which ones were repairs or inspections? Well, how about these? I like these copy and paste ones. Those are my favorite ones. Yes. Well, and so you know, like if you can copy and paste and use common sense. But what happens is I see agents in a in a hurry, and they'll copy and paste. And then what they end up sending over is so fragmented, you're like, I don't you cut, you cut out part of what the inspector said. And you you attached it to something else. And so it can it the copy and paste can get in trouble, because sometimes it just doesn't make any sense. You actually have to read what you copy and paste. Because if it no longer makes any sense, it's like, toilet toilet flange. Okay, what am I going to do with it? copy and pasted? Do we have a toilet flange? Okay, we have one yes. Well, how about the ones where, where you see whether the statements are so long, and they put so many items in and you just lose concept of whatever they're trying to ask at this point? Yes, I feel like that happens more in H back in SEO 100. For some reason, like, people, I think was Seo 100. Because we're dealing with like structural integrity. And you know, we don't ever like to use the M word. It's fungal growth, right? Because, you know, we're a subtropical climate. So there's been guy everywhere, right? But it's been more to say, fun guy, by the way, right? Yes, it's fungal growth, not the N word. But I do see where people try to like just overcomplicate the repair, you know, it's like replace outer band cell with like treated would have all damage evaluated, repaired and taken out, you know, I mean, it's just like, Oh, my gosh, you're making this way more complicated, I need to do. And that's not really your job as the agent to dictate the repair that's needed. You know, your job is just to articulate what the inspector has said, so that we're all on the same page. But I love it when agents get real creative and start writing their own narrative as to what needs to happen. I also like the ones where they just make these positive statement statements like the toilet flange is rotten. Right, let me let me do it that repairing replacing the floor, right? So if I saw that as a seller, all I'm acknowledging is yes, I acknowledge that it's rotten, but I haven't agreed to do anything about it. Correct? Yeah. And I think the other ones that always cracks me up is when they'll say the air conditioner has issue A or B, and they'll send this big broad repair, air conditioner. And then you're like, what part of repairs and then then the seller gets mad because they sign it. This is another side of it's not just the buyers just doing crappy work is now the seller signs because the listing agent doesn't say, wait a minute, and now you just open the wallet of the seller for everything that now the hpac company says is wrong. This is my favorite one. repair all rotten wood. Like the whole on the whole. You know, mean? A lot of times, the inspector will take a picture of a couple places and then they'll say, you know, here's what we've noted on the exterior, but have a contractor further evaluate. And so a lot of agents will just write repair all rotten wood, and I'm like a wool. Okay, but like let's say we do and then some more pops up like I just feel like that is the worst one down a rabbit holes with that are fixed all termite issues. Yeah, what a good one too. Because, you know, in especially these older homes, there's the old termite damage or old powderpost beetle damage, that's fine. You know, it doesn't need to be repaired. So when you send something over that just says fix all termite damage, it's like wool, I may have to replace every single sill at the in the 10s of 1000s of dollars. Right? So what do you think the problem is? Why do we get so many of these bad addendums? From agents? Oh, guys, I think the number one problem is just lack of setting expectations up front with the buyers. I think the second reason is lack of education on the agent's part, yep. I think a lot of agents are too busy to try to actually understand what some of these repairs actually entail or mean. You know, I think it's really important to not just educate yourself as an agent on just like regular agent stuff, like you need to know to drop the list. Like you need to know what a shower pan is, you need to know what these things are. Because you got to help your client understand what the inspector is telling them and as a listing agent, decide how much of this is really going to be necessary to keep the deal together as a seller's agent, right. I say like, this is my plug for pre inspections. Right? I feel like if more agents did pre inspections, then that would take the surprise out of the con out of the due diligence period because it is nerve racking. They don't know what to expect, right? Right. We do pre inspections on all of our listings for that very reason. Because I'm like, let's go ahead and get, you know, just rip the band aid off Good, bad and ugly. Let's figure out what we're doing. Because a lot of sellers I don't believe know what's wrong with their house, oh, people 20 years they don't know no or just I tell my buyers all the time, like the inspection report we're about to send over is just as much a surprise to you as it is going to be to the seller because nobody frequents their crawlspace or their at. I think another part of it is I think that agents when they get the deal signed, they're so scared to lose the deal. They don't want to write up a really correct addendum, they just want to say as little as possible not to scare the other side. And I think then the seller when they get it, they're they're afraid to lose that deal. And they're so afraid that they go back and actually change it and actually write real addendum language is going to now scare off the buyer somehow. And I think that's a big to do about it. But you still have a duty to your client to do your job and you can't not do your job because you're scared of losing the deal. In my opinion. Yeah. agents, this is their chance to like, you know, we've said this all the time, like agents can ruin more deals and buyers and sellers ever could. So sometimes I feel like this is where agents feel like they have to flex their muscles to like, show what an awesome negotiator they are like how they can just steamroll the other side and they lose sight as as to like, hey, our job is to help move the ball forward. And look out for our clients best interest is not a good thing that I've been a lot of your meetings with your agents in you. And I often hear you and Brad say things about bad random start went before Penn has ever put the paper. So what do you guys mean by that? Yeah. So I think, you know, a lot of this can be alleviated if buyers or agents working with buyers would do a better job setting the expectation upfront, like even before they start talking about contracts. So we do we make sure that we tell our buyers several times. Now, obviously, sometimes you just get crazy people you know, but I think if you can try to set the expectation upfront and let them know that, hey, the point of a home inspection is to tell you the condition of the property that you're buying. It's not an automatic repair list, right? So when we make an offer, we're making an offer based on what we saw, and what they told us on the disclosure. Right. So then when we do our due diligence period, we do our inspections, if anything comes up that now affects the value for us, right, like a GFCI really shouldn't affect the value for right. But for example, if you know the property disclosure, they put brand new h back 2019. And then we do our inspections and we find out Oh, well, they really just replace the air conditioner, they didn't replace the furnace. And the furnace is going to be $5,000. Now that we wouldn't maybe we wouldn't have offered full ask because we offer full ask with the understanding that the H back was brand new. Now again, a lot of sellers don't understand the difference between you know how their h bag system works. So I don't think sellers are out there. misleading people, they paid a lot of money to replace a part of their h vac system. They thought the whole thing was replaced, right? But now we're in a situation where, okay, that would affect the value for my buyer now. So I think that's something that you can try to go back and say, Hey, we had a misunderstanding, we wouldn't have offered full ask if we'd known we still have a $5,000 repair. You know, I think that's then you're within your reason to try to renegotiate with the seller but I get so tired of all these repairs in them that are so nitpicky, especially in older homes, I'm like the seller does not owe you a brand new home. They don't owe you a brand new roof they don't owe you a brand new h vac system they owe your roof is not leaking. Ryan ah back that works. You know, but you're not buying a brand new house and I think so many times agents, they don't set that expectation. And so when it comes time to the repair agenda is the wild wild west buyers are just you know, going to ask for anything and they're beyond repair list or honey do list their their improvement Home Improvement list. Correct. And I have seen many times when when that happens where there literally won't touch up paint done and they want a light socket tightens, like write your own screwdriver and turn it in, I think my favorite outlet. I'm like, an outlet does not have to be grounded to be safe and to be operable, like look at your lamps, their two prongs, look at your mixer. It's two prongs, like there are lots of things that work in an ungrounded outlet and it's a Okay, you know, but I they're just a lot of people to get in a tizzy about that. And I'm like, you know, the seller has been living in the house for the last 20 years and that little ungrounded outlet has been just fine. I do think that's the key is setting the expectations understanding that it's not a honey do list or improvements list. And truly if it's cosmetic and it doesn't affect the value, I don't think people should be asking for it. Right. I think that's the key is does this affect the value of a home like if the appraiser knew about this, would he take that into consideration you know, if you look at an appraisal, they they always have to put the verbiage like this appraisal is under the assumption that the H BAC is in working order that the you know, heating and you know roof system is in working order. So, if they if the appraiser knew that the furnace wasn't working, that would affect the value because now it's it's affecting the heated and cooled square footage right. So I think if people could keep that in mind, it might help rein people in a little bit. I think if you're repaired denim is at nine Items long, that's probably a good indication you've asked for things you shouldn't be. That's just, I mean, it's, we are just the messenger. Sometimes I myself have definitely been in a situation where I've had a buyer that's just adamant about asking for things that I don't, you know, I don't think are worth asking for. But it's my fiduciary responsibility to represent them the best way that I can. But do you think if we can do a better job within our profession of trying to set that expectation, we will start to weed those people out? How do you think the actual inspection reports contribute to better denims? Again, it's the wild wild west, there's some really good inspectors out there. And then there's some that I'm like, Oh, my gosh, how did you get whatever license you need to get to do this? You know, I mean, I've had inspectors tell buyers in their report, you will not be able to get homeowners insurance. Because of this. I'm like, you can't say that. You don't know that. And then there's some inspectors that I feel like, take it as their mission to find things and, and not just, like, find the things but like, will scare the buyer. You know, like, they'll make comments like, oh, man, like the structural integrity of this house is just shot. I'm like, you're not a structural engineer, you don't know that. You can't see that. Right. So good inspectors is good. I also think sometimes in some of their writings, the things they write aren't very clear as to what they're asking. So I do think agents would would serve themselves well, to go back to an inspector and say, can you please clarify this statement? Does it need to be replaced? Does it need to be repaired? Does it need to be reevaluated you're not clear on that? Think finding some good home inspectors that you know, and trust and trying to use just those people will help as well. I think sometimes bad denims even start, before we even get to the inspection. I think sometimes the seller already sets us up for we're going to have a bad agenda. Um, so what are some issues you see on the seller side that that can affect us? Oh, gosh, yeah. So sometimes you run into sellers that are like, Oh, I'm not filling out a property disclosure. Like my attorney told me not to do that, or I'm just gonna check in on everything. And, you know, I listen to my podcast about no representation, by the way, and realize you can't do that in South Korea. I have a podcast on that. Okay. So they should not Yes, we'll reference them there. So I always tell my sellers, hey, look, don't be afraid of this document. I think the property disclosure is a great tool for you, because a buyer has to see it before they make an offer. Right. And so this is a great place to showcase all the upgrades, you've done all the nice things about the house. And if the house is, uh, there are some issues, let's go ahead and get ahead of that, right like there, the buyer is going to find out, not gonna, they're not gonna not find out. Nobody likes a surprise. And nobody can make a good decision when they feel backed into a corner. So I feel like the best way to position a seller is to go ahead, tell the buyer everything, you're never going to get in trouble for over disclosure, I've never seen anybody get sued or in trouble for over disclosing. Have you Gary know, now for that. So you're never getting in trouble for over disclose. Right. So like, go ahead and rip that band aid off. But I think that conversation has to be had with the agent. And all of that has to have, you know, like when we talk about pricing, we're also talking about the condition of the home. So all of that goes hand in hand. I think all of that has to happen in that in that pre listing conversation so that your seller isn't scared of the disclosure anymore. They embrace it, because like, Oh, yeah, this is a great place where I can highlight all the things because I tell them, it's human nature, the minute somebody walks into your house, they're immediately looking for reasons not to pay you what you want for your property. Right? Right. So if you can start to disarm that, you know, like, Hey, here's a here are my utility bills, here are all the upgrades I've done. Here are the top 10 things I love about living here, here's a pre inspection, then they start to let their guard down, and then they start to emotionally connect with the home and then it starts to become more of a Oh, yay, this seller's tell the seller is telling me everything you know. So then they go to the next house and that seller doesn't have a disclosure, anything that like well, that one must be hiding something from right. I agree. And another issue I see sometimes on the seller side, and then we'll move on real quick to the actual writing is that sometimes when a buyer will send a very poorly written addendum over and the seller accepts that thinking, aha, I got them because they didn't really clarify what they want. But we all know what happens when they get to closing and the buyer hasn't made the gotten the repair made that they wanted. And the seller was like Well, you didn't really ask for it. We know who's gonna pay for that. And that's gonna be the agent. Yeah, bring your checkbook. So this brings us now to the part I really want to talk about, which is the actual writing of the form. And being that you're a former school teacher, I thought you'd be a great person to have I know y'all use your own format. We do recommend people use the ccra form or the SCR form, and your form basically lines with those. But I think the problem with writing repair denims goes, it goes in addition to this, is it how people write and we were taught in middle school, it's who, what, when, where and how. And I think that gets lost. We just write the what we want. What we don't ever talk about what who's going to do it, when's it going to be done? What's going to be done? How's it going to be done and I think that's a big part. We have, yeah, no, I totally agree. And I think using, like, less is more, right. So I just state the facts, like what needs to be done, how it needs to be done, who's gonna do it, what it should look like. But I like using the word ensure, like, ensure that the toilet is no longer actively leaking clear verbiage, like, please ensure and you know, the power of the word please. And a repair done them is, I think, super powerful because it kind of takes the sting out. And people don't like to be bossed around. Nobody likes what to do. So I do think the power of please and are repaired and can go a long way like, now I do tell my buyers, I'm like, hey, it's not your house yet. You don't get to dictate who does the work. Because if you get hit by a bus and you don't buy this house, like ultimately, the seller is paying somebody to do so I do help my buyer to understand like, we don't get to dictate who does the work, right. But we're gonna, we're going to outline what we want done. And then most inspectors will charge a very small fee to come back and re inspect to make sure you know, what we communicated was actually repaired. But I do think If yes, if you can just keep it concise, to what exactly needs to get done. And if you're not clear with inspectors go back and ask them, I have to do that all the time. I'm like, What did you mean by this? You know, and then they can usually clarify it, you kind of got to use a lot of common sense. And sometimes I think common sense lose, we lose common sense. We do contracts. I'd like to tell people my best advice is have somebody played devil's advocate, write it. And you can even be your own devil's advocate write it and say, How can the other side take advantage of what I just wrote? How can they weasel out of what I'm asking them to do? Absolutely. And once you figure that out, for like, holes to not let like metaphorical holes, like for example, if you say replace rotten wood on exterior, well, what am I replacing it with more wood or hardieplank? And then do I have to paint it when I put it back up? You know? So like, I just think you need to think a little bit beyond the repair itself and like how is this repair going to affect the rest of the house. But one other thing before we get to the final topic on this is I think it's very important and we talked about this a bunch is that when you have negotiations, there's going to be scratched it out. So there's going to be initials, is remember a legal duty of the real estate agent to make sure that all items that are scratched out are initialed and dated. So please don't make the mistake of only having one side initial and the other not I have had agents have have grievances thought against them because items were not initialed by both sides. And every one of those cases what happens are, the initials aren't there. And then the buyer, the seller says Well, I thought this was going to be done by you or the buyer says I thought it was going to be done. And then they look to the real estate agent and make the repair who then refuses. So now there's a grievance, something you had no responsibility for making a repair on but because you did not get it initialed, you want it with a grievance, you violated the law. And now you're making the repayments for that. So you don't want to do that last topic. I want to talk real quickly as we're running out of time is talk about managing expectations. Clients not really understanding when things are scratched out. How do you make sure that your buyer knows they're not making this repair? Because I think during all the negotiations, they they forget about it? Mm hmm. Yeah, well, I think we need to remember that this is a very emotionally charged process for buyers and sellers, right. And so it's our job to make sure that you know, we are the calm voice of reason. Number one, right. So if my job is to be the calm voice of reason, then I need to be able to articulate to my buyer. Okay, here's what they have said they were going to do, here's what they're not going to do. This is what we're scratching out you're going to initial next to what they've scratched out so that it so everybody understands that. Here's what our final agreed to repeat. And sometimes that means rewriting they're paired in them. And I know that's more work for agents. But I do think we do a disservice to our agents to let them sign this sloppy addendum when nobody really knows who's fixing what. So I think again, you know, if we're going to be the calm voice of reason and the the the fiduciary in this transaction, then sometimes we have to rewrite the whole thing. Yes, it's more work, but you got to do it. You want to make sure you're protecting yourself and your client, which is what we all need to be doing. And the last thing I would say on these expectations is making sure you have plenty of time to get the repairs to be done. Most lawyers are simply not going to hold escrow any money anymore. Our insurance companies don't want us to hold it. So you want to make sure you have enough time to get these repairs done or extend your contract. Yeah. Well, Mary lane, we've covered a lot today. I really appreciate you being with us. Yeah, no, it's my pleasure. Thanks for having me. Thanks. Thanks. Now to our segment, digging dirt. Our special guests is Edie yandel of executive construction. He has been on our show once before and today he is joining us to talk about nail pops. Yes sir. Glad to be here. But tell everybody what is a nail pop on they'll pop. The majority time is actually not a nail. Sexy. Screw where the sheet rockers actually screw the sheet rock to the wall. And the area where the mud covers over the screw is what it often gets called a nail pop. Okay, and so that's where that actually worked its way back out of the sheet rock and leaves a dimple. Exactly, because it's just a such a small area for the sheetrock mud to bond under, it's really easy for it not to not to stick all the time. And one of the main causes of nail pops main cause of nail pops or, you know, young lumber, lumber gets cut a lot earlier in the in the, in the in the world we're in now versus maybe 30 years ago, it gets cut earlier, and the lumber yards are not actually even allowing it to dry out like it should. So essentially, it's essentially when the lumber decides to dry out when the heating and air comes on in the house. It actually it'll actually move a little bit here or there. And it makes that one little infinite move to we'll actually call some nail polish on one of the instances where you know, house selling over, you know, over a year's time houses move. It's not a structural thing, how's it moving? As long as Earth keeps turning? They're gonna move. That's your other other calls up at the majority of time. And I guess particularly here in the Midlands, where a lot of our houses are built on BLM sand. Yep. Oh, yeah, exactly. Yep. is a nail pop structural? Or is it cosmetic? It is cosmetic 100%? And what would you recommend a client do if they have a new home and they're starting to see nail pops, just contact your builder. So in the process that they take all builders use different timelines to fix some, whatever, you know, whatever the builders couple with, they're certainly going to take care of it on their timelines. Everybody's will be different. Yep. Hi, Dave, appreciate you being with us. Again, look forward to having you on again. You got it. Thanks for your help today. abbreviated version of Gary's good news only a part of this episode is anecdotal. And that every morning and every afternoon, when I come to work and go home from work, I drive by the South County Health Department on bull Street. And they have set up since Christmas, a testing facility outside where in any given day, there will be 40 or 50, cars waiting to be tested. And the cars are so many in the parking lot that it actually goes back into the road. And that's been pretty full since the last day or the day after Christmas. This week, every single day that I have driven by on the way to work or on the way home to work. There's either been no cars or just one or two cars. And so what I'm hoping that is showing is that we have peaked in South Carolina and we're now on the downward trend that actually matches CDCs information that says when one of these bikes occur, they last about six to eight weeks. Now to back that up with non anecdotal evidence. When you go to h h ss COVID update, they are showing that in the United States 64 jurisdictions in the various cities and states that 82% of the jurisdictions are now in a downward trajectory. 86% were down last week, on 66 a week before so it does appear that we are in a downward trend and most of the country, we're only at a 16% of jurisdictions that are an upward trend trajectory. So that does appear that the number of COVID cases seem to be going down. That's good news, vaccines. So far 31 million vaccines have been distributed. And so far 12 point 2 million have been administered. So hopefully more and more people are getting the vaccine. The vaccine plus the people that have had COVID hopefully will get us to a herd immunity quicker than anybody believes. They do not know for sure as you can tell, because we've heard numbers anywhere between 20% and 80% needed for herd immunity. So somewhere between 20 and 80%. We'll get there. So that's Gary's abbreviated version of Gary's good news only. And that's our show for today. We greatly appreciate our guests Mary lane Sloane for joining us. If you like our show, we ask that you please like and subscribe to us and help us build the number of listeners as well by referring this to your real estate agent friends. Please don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube page as we continue to try to build that a link is below in the write up of this podcast. And you could also go to YouTube and type in Blair Cato. There you will find all of our videos that we have done legal tips as well as Gary good news only. This will be your complete library of all the videos that we have done over the last couple of years. I hope everybody has a wonderful and safe week.